Ask the Right Questions to Find the Right Agent

Finding the right agent to represent your child means looking for a good match. You want someone who is excited by your child’s talent and enthusiastic about working hard to promote your young performer’s career. How do you find the best fit? Asking the right questions will dig out the information you need. Here are some basic questions to help get you started.

What area of the industry does the agent handle? 

Does your child want to appear on network television or work in theater or do commercials? Many agents specialize in one of the three areas. Are you talking to the right agent? Help your child decide on career goals and align your agent search with those goals.

Where does your child fit into the agency?

Will he stand out? It’s easy to get lost in the crowd if you’re represented by a big-name agency. Smaller agencies have small numbers of clients, and they can be eager to spend more time developing your child’s career. You want to work with an agency that represents actors who are similar to your child. You know the types of shows you are targeting. Look for agents who represent actors in those shows.

What will the agent do for your child?

Ask the agent to give you an idea of exactly how they intend to help secure auditions for you. Will they actively call casting directors on the phone and send emails to “pitch” your child for projects?

What is the agent’s success rate?

Are the actors they represent finding work? It’s great if the agency-client list on IMDb Pro drops big names from the 1990s, but you want an agency that’s securing jobs for their clients in this decade.

Do casting directors know the agency?

If your agent has established a reputation over the years and is respected in the industry, casting directors will listen to their pitches.

Is the agency franchised? 

Look on the SAG-AFTRA website for a list of franchised agents. Guild franchise agreements with agencies protect actors. As an example, franchise agreements limit the agency’s commission to 10 percent for union work.

Is the agent enthusiastic about representing your child?

Does the agent believe in your child’s talent? Are they as excited about your child’s career as you are? If so, they will fight to get the young performer into an audition. They’ll be willing to work with you because they want your child to succeed.

 

 

 

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